Maps, camera, action

I love my phone. It was one of those items I lusted after for ages before my contract would let me get it.

I’m still not using all the features of my Galaxy Samsung Note II but the holiday pushed me to my limits and I learned a few things about the phone along the way.

We had a big, ring-bound map of France but in ring-bound tradition where we wanted to go was always on the spine. We relied on the Google Maps navigation on my phone for both walking and driving and it never let us down. The pronunciation of the French streets made us laugh a lot but then maybe the guy was saying them phonetically in a dead pan English accent so we’d understand him.

What impressed me most was being on the website of a museum which had a link asking if I wanted directions. I was expecting a jpeg of a map with written directions but no – it linked straight into the mapping on my phone. Two seconds, bisch, basch, bosch. Food for thought for our responsive design website.

The other thing I used a few times was Google Translate which was quicker than me trying to make out the miniscule writing in my Collins mini French dictionary.

When we were out and about the camera on my phone was also much less hassle than my DSLR. Aside from the speed of taking photos on my phone, they are so much easier to post on Facebook, Twitter and WordPress – the Canon requires a cable, a PC and non-temperamental photo management software. I used it for the photos about WW1 but that’s only because they’ll be used in various publications and need to be hi-res.

The other nifty thing is the Paper Artist app that came with the phone. It does similar effects to the artistic effects on Photoshop but is much easier to use. Even rubbish photos take on some kind other life that makes them useable.

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From all that I have learned:

  • sometimes the things you didn’t know you needed are the things you need most
  • some people think it’s OK to ‘enhance’ a photo taken with a DSLR but diss phone cameras. Seriously – take a look at yourselves
  • I hardly ever use my phone for what it was invented

Today’s track

Today’s recipe

Pork Satay

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Serves 2 – 3

Ingredients

1 pork fillet

sesame or peanut oil for brushing,plus some for the sauce

1 onion,chopped

1 garlic clove, chopped finely

1 tsp Lazy Red Chillies

1tbsp soy sauce

5 tbsp crunchy peanut butter

150mls water

half a tin of coconut milk

Method: Slice the fillet to half centimetre thicknesses. Place them a few at a time between to pieces of clingfilm and beat with a rolling pin or meat tenderiser until very thin.

Heat the a little oil in a heavy-based pan and cook the onion and garlic. Add the chilli, soy sauce, water and peanut butter and mix well. Bring to the boil then stir in the coconut milk.

While that’s being made heat a griddle or a large frying pan. Brush the pork pieces with oil and flash fry on a high heat. Serve with rice.

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5 comments

  1. Janet E Davis · April 13, 2013

    I really miss my DSLR (not least because my camera phone is one of the lowest quality) but it is the photographer, not the camera that counts.

    • carolynemitchell · April 13, 2013

      That’s what I think too but I’ve been really turned off by the camera club for some of their opinions about equipment, Photoshop and social media. So I’m starting a photography club at work instead so we can start with no prejudices.

      • Janet E Davis · April 14, 2013

        Are they anti Photoshop? I’m aware that some don’t seem to understand that Photoshop is part of the equivalent of the darkroom. If the early photographers had decided that they had to stick with the first process that worked, the cameras and processes we have today would never have happened.

      • carolynemitchell · April 15, 2013

        Exactly the opposite. They require so many effects and layers that it doesn’t even look like a photo any more. That’s fine if you know how to use the camera properly and you’re composition is good. I joined in the hope I’d learn the basics but they were too focused on Photoshop for my liking. They also didn’t rate anything buy dslrs and didn’t see the need for any speakers talking about social media or phone cameras.

      • Janet E Davis · April 15, 2013

        Interesting!

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